Posts Tagged ‘brain music’



Can YouTube Read Your Mind?

Monday, December 5th, 2011

An interesting clip was published by researchers from UC Berkeley earlier this year, which claimed they had managed to use functional MRI data to create a composite YouTube video corresponding to the visual input received by the test subject…
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Is Music Bad For Brains?

Friday, August 27th, 2010

It has often been suggested that listening to music while studying distracts from the learning process, while others argue that it makes the learning environment more comfortable – and in fact, research shows that music can actually increase cognitive functioning in certain cases. A recent study from Applied Cognitive Psychology aimed to find out whether listening to liked music had a greater effect than listening to disliked music…
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Brain Music Can Relieve Stress

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

It is common knowledge that music can have a therapeutic and soothing effect; in fact, music is uniquely potent when it comes to eliciting emotional responses. However, recent studies show that the brain is capable of composing stress-relieving music of its own…
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Jazz Jam Shuts Down Prefrontal Cortex

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

A recent study by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) has discovered that some remarkable transformations take place in the brains of jazz musicians when they begin to improvise…

(from Music Technology)
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Five Ways That Music Fools Your Brain

Friday, February 22nd, 2008

Everybody is familiar with optical illusions, as we encounter them regularly in advertising, movies and student-flat Escher prints, but the area of auditory illusion is much less familiar territory. However, our ears are also susceptible to manipulative trickery…
(from Music Technology)
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Big Ears Make Music Good

Monday, February 4th, 2008

It’s a well-known fact that many people have no taste in music; in fact, anyone who disagrees with you would fall into this category. We tend to have well-defined comfort zones with regard to what we listen to, whether that be the soporific major-key dronings of afternoon radio or the mangled circuit-bending madness of a honey-coated vintage synth carcass being manipulated by an industrial spin-dryer. It’s probably a safe bet that neither of these (not entirely imaginary) individuals would enjoy listening to the other’s record collection; but is there any way of explaining the vast differences in musical taste that make the music world so very fascinating?
(from Music Technology)
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